R 90 CAFÉ RACER.

A Nordic soul and his special motorcycle from Alaska.

The look – classical.

It is clear from first glance how much love is devoted to this bike. The paintwork alone: the pastel green is reminiscent of the green of the classical Bianchi "Celeste" racing bike. The cream white fulfils this requirement with a portion of elegance and Perry Cowles is responsible for the brown trim brand. A former sign painter who is now running his own shop as an Airbrush institution with Perry's Rod and Custom. And is conveniently also located in Alaska.
And the attention to detail and quality can also be found in the customised leather tool bag. It fits precisely into the frame and in doing so is in perfect harmony with the leather and the design of the seat. A truly permanent passion, because since these pictures were taken, the machine has been redesigned again and again in the many details. Even where everything already looked perfect. The saddle and even the rear mirror now match the leather handlebar grips better with small material modifications. And the standard Bing 32 carburettor was replaced with a Dell'Orto 38. But what's all the enthusiasm about?
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Long days.

Long days.

Alaska, the 49th American state. One of its nicknames: ’The last frontier’. After a glance at the world map, it quickly becomes clear why: Siberia starts in the west of Alaska. To the east is Canada’s Yukon. Go a little further north and the Arctic Ocean will freeze your toes. Alaska is also known as the land of the midnight sun. Here, in the short summer season, there are four months of uninterrupted daylight. And as a result a perfect view over the wide roads. Ideal motorcycling conditions, in fact. Actually, because Alaska also has a dark side.

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Long nights.

Long nights.

In contrast to the permanently light summer season, the winters in Alaska seem endlessly long, pitch dark and usually terribly cold. Again, ideal motorcycling conditions, in fact. Provided one has a few like-minded friends, access to a workshop, proper tools and of course a passion for customising. The result of a winter like this is then at least as special as the nights are long. Or simply as beautiful as Erik's truly memorable BMW R 90 Café Racer.

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Passion knows no age.

In his life outside of the workshop, Erik runs his own agency for insurance and financial products. Yet with a roller, the customising began in his school days. And now a Café Racer?
"After all, the scene is steeped more in dark and rebellious machines. Yet I wanted a clean, refined look of an old café racer style. I’m too young to have a fairing and too old to have a crotch rocket [race replica]. I used to be an enthusiastic cyclist and pilot, which can now also be seen from the modification. For instance on the prominent and minimalistic cockpit".
His passion would appear to be limitless. So where does Erik, who after all is a father and a husband, find the time for all this? Simple answer: by not lounging around on the sofa in front of the TV. And there are always a few spare hours when the children are in bed or at the weekend. After all, Erik also builds his machines so that his children will later be able to ride. He doesn't waste a single moment's thought on selling. Especially not when he sees how much fun his youngest have when they are allowed to help their father in the workshop. Although, help? At least everyone has fun together. And this doesn't damage any project.
Erik skilfully manages to impart a few lessons to his children in the workshop as well: responsibility, safety, creativity, satisfaction, dedication and passion. And this can't harm later in life. If you want to find out more about Erik and his friends in the far north, simple take a look at his Facebook page.
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Go to the facebook page
I wanted a clean, refined look of an old café racer style. I’m too young to have a fairing and too old to have a crotch rocket [race replica].

Erik Christensen

Here are five tips from Erik.

1. Build the motorcycle twice. Once before it has been painted. I have made the mistake of only building it once. And had to do it again to meet my expectations.
2. Take your time. Develop a precise concept before starting. An unsuccessful assembly is often the result of hesitant decisions.
3. Do not listen to other people's opinions. Only do what feels right for you personally. After all, you will be the one who will ultimately ride and love the bike.
4. Whenever you have an itch or a grumbling in your stomach – get yourself the essentials for assembling your bike: coffee, beer and pizza.
5. Never sacrifice your kids or marriage for a machine. When you're old, the bike is hardly likely to take care of you.
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